ContentedWeb
Web accessibility, photos, travel and random noise

Accessibility and web development posts

  • Forestry.io

    Having moved my site from Wordpress to Eleventy hosted on Netlify, I was looking for a better editing experience than the one provided by writing my posts in a text editor or even in GitHub itself. I've settled on Forestry for now.

  • The Jamstack, will it supplant Wordpress?

    The web being the web, there are always opinions on which tool is better, which language superior or which hosting model future proof. The main argument for hosting appears to be traditional CMS (eg Wordpress) vs static sites and headless CMS (eg Netlify). A gentleman's barter was made between Matt Mullenweg and Ohad Eder-Pressman, with Eder-Pressman asserting that the JAMStack will be the dominant architecture by Sept 2025, overtaking Wordpress who currently host over 35% of the top 10K sites.

  • Moving to Netlify

    I've now moved my site over to Netlify. Having hosted it, at least in part, on Nearlyfreespeech for the best part of 15 years, I have decided to go fully serverless. This is not a slight on Nearlyfreespeech, I have had only positive experiences on Nearlyfreespeech and they will continue to host some legacy files of mine. The main reason for this switch is because I started using Eleventy, a static site generator, to build my site. This is great, it lead to much faster load times. But it meant I had to be on my personal laptop to update the content. I couldn't use an online service to update the site, like I could previously with Wordpress. At least not without a lot of extra effort and technical skills I don't really have. Sure I could create my content in GitHub, but to build and publish the site I needed to run the scripts that were on my laptop.

  • The value of accessibility

    Jeremy Keith recently blogged about the great usability of the UKs Covid vaccination online booking process. Having recently renewed my UK passport online I can only second this. The UKs test and trace system perhaps wasn't world beating. But their Government Digital Service most defintely is!

  • JavaScript for the ages

    Thanks to a post by Jeremy Keith, I came across this post by Remy Sharp on the changing web and framework fatigue.

  • NearlyFreeSpeech.Net

    This site is hosted on NearlyFreeSpeech.net. I've been using them since 2006 and I couldn't recommend their service highly enough. They are essentially a pay as you go service, where you pay for what you use. This makes them incredibly cheap for low use sites like mine. This site costs me less than $1 a month in hosting charges.

  • Privacy - how GDPR is meant to work

    Finally a company that has got rid of all non-essential cookies and therefore does not need to annoy it's users with annoying privacy popups, often purposefully designed to confuse you into choosing the least private option. Well done to GitHub for removing all non-essential cookies and getting rid of privacy popups.

  • Eleventy, webmentions and my new site

    It's finally done. I migrated my site from WordPress to a static site generated by eleventy. I've also managed to get webmentions working of a sort. Many thanks for all the great help available on the internet.

    I list here some sites I found especially helpful, but of course there are many others who gave me a nudge in the right direction.

  • Introducing the ROBIN Stack

    Following this idea I saw on Chris Ferdinandi's site, of defining our stacks using our name, I present you the ROBIN stack:

  • Dissecting the WAD, part 10

    This is a 10 parts series examining the WAD. In this final part of the series we look at articles 11 to 15 of the directive.

  • Dissecting the WAD, part 9

    This is a 10 parts series examining the WAD. In this 9th part of the series we look at articles nine and 10 of the directive. The previous parts of this series are:

  • Dissecting the WAD, part 8

    This is a 10 parts series examining the WAD. In this 8th part of the series we look at article eight of the directive. The previous parts of this series are:

  • Dissecting the WAD, part 7

    This is a 10 parts series examining the WAD. In this 7th part of the series we look at article seven of the directive. The previous parts of this series are:

  • Dissecting the WAD, part 6

    This is a 10 parts series examining the WAD. In this 6th part of the series we start going through the articles of the directive, covering articles one to six. The previous parts of this series are:

  • Dissecting the WAD, part 5

    This is a 10 parts series examining the WAD. In this 5th part of the series we finish off going through the introductory recitals, starting with recital 47. The previous parts of this series are:

  • Dissecting the WAD, part 4

    In part 1 of this series about the WAD, we covered the title and heading sections.  In part 2 and part 3 of the series we continued by looking at the first 32 recitals. In this fourth part we continue going through the introductory recitals which give the background to the directive. The official text is available here.

  • Dissecting the WAD, part 3

    In part 1 of this series about the WAD, we covered the title and heading sections. In part 2 of the series we continued by looking at the first 20 recitals. In this third part we continue going through the introductory recitals which give the background to the directive. The official text is available here.

  • Dissecting the WAD, part 2

    In part 1 of this series about the WAD, we covered the title and heading sections. In this second part we go through the introductory recitals which give the background to the directive. The official text is available here.

  • Dissecting the WAD, part 1

    In the next series of posts we will be going through the legal text of the Web Accessibility Directive (WAD), explaining the meaning of each section.

  • WAD, HEN and WCAGs

    We all love an acronym, so let’s start with these three:

    • Web Accessibility Directive, the WAD,
    • Harmonised European Standard (norm), HEN,
    • Web Content Accessibility Guidelines, the WCAG.

Webmentions

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